Visarend!

Following a day of uncharacteristically heavy rain, we were glad to get out at Dengemarsh on a bright and typical September morning, relishing as ever the first view from the slightly raised Springfield Bridge across the back of the RSPB reserve, over wildfowl, Cormorants, Common Terns and a cruising Marsh Harrier.

Big crowds of Lapwings kept surging up, trialing 3 Ruff just below. From high up in the blue came the call of Golden Plover – at first just one still with a black belly flashing in the sunshine but then a flock of maybe 100 which stuck around for the rest of the morning either circling semi-visibly in the sky or settling for a while on an island adding their fluting chorus to the wailing of Lapwings.

We soon began to pick out raptors across the horizon: Kestrel, Hobby, Buzzard, Marsh Harrier, and then high up a Carrion Crow was persistently harassing a smaller falcon  – a Merlin.

Another nice thing about coming in from Dengemarsh Road is that you meet very few people. The second we met at the crossroads by the hide (has this spot got a name?) was an RSPB guy who informed us that we’d missed some early morning action with a fall nearer the point – in fact there was a Wryneck still there at The Desert. It would be easy to locate since there would be a crowd of people watching it. While there have been occasions when I’ve really wished for such a crowd when fruitlessly searching for some interesting yet needle-in-a-haystack bird, I generally avoid them. The RXbirdwalks way is not to rush off after something supposedly more exciting but to visit a promising location and just see what’s there.

So we continued looking at a few warblers in the scrub and scanning the sky for birds of prey, and while watching a flock of 4 Buzzards, a big bird came gliding over the willows – an Osprey! There had been one or two about all week but – it’s not a zoo – you can’t be sure of seeing one but this bird stayed around for about 20 minutes, gliding, hovering & diving – inexpertly it seemed because after several unsuccessful lunges it caught a rather small fish and flapped off to consume it atop one of the many vertical structures Dungeness has to offer. A spectacular bird, one that I don’t see all that often and rarely as close as this, a useful opportunity to check the plumage details that made it (apart from the amateur fishing) a young bird.

It looked much closer at the time! Thanks to Stuart Barnes for the photo.

Reasoning that the open sky offered the best spectacle, we spent some time on the Viewpoint though by that time there were fewer birds in the air (apart from Golden Plovers) but a distant Peregrine put up a cloud of Starlings over at the chicken sheds. On the small pools to the west (I don’t know what they’re called either) we found Little Grebe, Sparrowhawk (8th raptor species) & Bearded Tits then, proceeding with effort over soft and sticky arable land, arrived at Brickwall Farm beside which 4 Whinchats and a very scruffy Stonechat perched in a weedy patch beside a skeletal barn.

 

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