Drowned lands

The plan for Saturday was a walk around Wet Level, following the Rother  up as far as Potman’s Heath before turning back through the narrow lanes SW of Wittersham, where I first led a walk (in nicer weather) 5 years ago. Since I’d not been there for a while I thought it best to have a recce and it’s just as well I did since this was the view from Blackwall Bridge; our route, to the left of that concrete bank, lay under a couple of feet of water. In addition, the forecast was poor, leading me to postpone the walk, but then improved…

In the end, a couple of us made an impromptu visit to Combe Valley a closer flooded river valley but with more assured access. It was a gloomy morning so the photos are very dull compared with those on the Friends of Combe Valley News FB page, but they give the idea. After heavy rain, this green valley is turned into a huge lake to hold back water and prevent flooding of the coastal ribbon development at Bulverhythe.

The Flood Attenuation Pond was doing its job, the raised water level having lifted the unidentified water weed that covered its surface in summer and let it rolled back by the brisk wind. As I suspected, the duck numbers there were lower – about a dozen each of Gadwall & Wigeon – since in the rest of the valley they were spoiled for choice with shallow lakes spreading all along it.

Out in the middle though, the small flocks of the same species were a similar size so might well have been the very same birds that had just moved about, the exceptions being 3 Tufted Ducks and about 50 Teal. Gliding about were 18 Mute Swans and over on the slopes to the south were 77 Greylags and a single Canada Goose

More than 30 Snipe zig-zagged up from the fields to the south of the Link Road and further down a tight flock of about 50 Pied Wagtails was running about on floating vegetation. There were several Stonechats flicking their wings on tall weeds, Cetti’s Warblers loud in cover and Buzzards mewing overhead..

It seems quite astonishing that, until recently, developers were proposing to build a “Sports Village” and a load of houses on the football fields further down the valley, having miraculously remained ignorant of all the recent debate about building on flood plains. You can find out more on the Bulverhytheprotectors FB page.

Once we had cut back up to the Greenway E of Decoy Pond, we followed it as far as the old railway line, where I was pleased to see that the Quarry Wood team had been busy felling trees to expose the beautiful sandstone face of the eponymous excavation.

There were few birds until we reached the cutting near Samson’s Lane, when we ran into a mixed flock of small birds including Blue & Great Tit, Treecreepers & Goldcrests. Among them was a Marsh Tit – not really surprising but nonetheless the first I’d seen here, but then I heard the click of a Hawfinch and after a few minutes wait, caught sight of it in the top of the scrub which now fills this damp hollow – another new bird for me here. Even though, exceptionally, they are being seen all over the place, I can’t get used to seeing them. (Two local places where they’re quite easy: Hastings Cemetery & “Feathers”, Salehurst where, in both cases, they’re attracted to Yew.

Back in the lane, we came across this Green Hellebore, a rare plant in the wild in Sussex but this one now doubt originating in an adjacent garden.

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